Image Gallery

EXTRA:ORDINARY

An inspired selection of artists and designers who adeptly and inventively reimagine the banal (scroll down for images)

Tom Friedman's work explores the possibilities of the ordinary. His ability to meticulously construct sculptures from the minuscule into objects of fantasy, mystery and whimsy, yet with objectivity, divulge notions between perception and reality. So intricately crafted, the insignificant becomes a sublime curiosity. Here, with Space Station, whitewashed commonplace household goods transform into a galactic daydream. 

Tom Friedman, Space Station, 1997, mixed media, 32 x 32 x 17 inches

© Tom Friedman; Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and Stephen Friedman Gallery, London

Tom Friedman, Untitled, 1996, cardboard box corner, 24 x 33 x 31 inches

© Tom Friedman; Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and Stephen Friedman Gallery, London

Brazilian artist Jac Lierner's preoccupation with consumer culture is the impetus for her creations. She amasses banal objects, such as discarded containers or household tools systematically ordering them into cohesive and minimal artworks and installations as exhibited here with Rolling Level No. 2.

Jac Lierner, Rolling Level No. 2, 2013; wood, paper and plexiglass, 5 7/8 x 50 3/8 x 1 9/16 in. (15 x 128 x 4 cm)

© Jac Leirner. Photo © White Cube (Edouard Fraipont) 

Andy Coolquitt is a rummager and collector. He reimagines the discarded rubbish of his urban environment into a cultural and aesthetic statement with commentary on our consumer-driven society. Ideas of the tangible and emotive are imbued in a poised column of used-up and empty lighters in an array of color.  

Andy Coolquitt, rainbow bic stick, 2011, found lighters, epoxy, acrylic rod, 72 x 1.5 x 6 inches, Inv# AC210

Andy Coolquitt, 3d FOURloco, 2012,  Plexiglas, aluminum cans, and steel cable, 23.5 x 13 x 23.5 inches

Inv#AC226

Belgian-based artist Pascal Marthine Tayou works in diverse media including found objects. He too considers consumerism, and as it pertains to globalization and colonization. Lyrically, colorfully and poignantly, Plastic Tree C postulates the perils of waste and the environment.

Pascal Marthine Tayou, Plastic Tree C, 2015, Installation view Art Basel Unlimited

Courtesy of the artist and GALLERIA CONTINUA, San Gimignano / Beijing / Les Moulins

Detail, Plastic C Tree, 2015

B. Wurtz's assemblages ingeniously combine found materials, such as plastic bags, and crafted elements without pretense. They seem familiar, possess a quiet comfort, yet are also eloquent. They are very gratifying and personable.  

B. Wurtz, Untitled, 2009, plastic bags, acrylic paint, string, canvas, 109.5 x 228.6 x 3.8 cm

Courtesy of the artist and Kate MacGarry, London

B. Wurtz, Untitled, 1997, plywood, plastic bag, wooden doll, rope, 61 x 97.8 cm

Courtesy of the artist and Kate MacGarry, London

Matías Cuevas revels in the visceral experience of painting, in its gestural actions and its improvisational interaction with materials. With his recent works, appropriated cheap hardware store products become a vehicle for exploration of mark-making and performative personal expression. Cuevas developed a unique method by setting fire to nylon carpets, his 'canvas', and then staining the surface with paint thinners and acrylic paints. The result is a remarkable textural surface with vibrant color washes and impressions of the artist's gestural stroke.

 Matías Cuevas, Almost There #38, 2014

Carpet, carpet trim, paint thinners, fire, acrylics on custom made stretcher, 60 x 84 inches (152 x 213 cm)

Matías Cuevas, Untitled Gestures for a Brand New Sky #10, 2014

Carpet, carpet trim, paint thinners, fire, and acrylic on custom made stretcher, 60 x 84 inches (152 x 213 cm)

The Brazilian born and based Campana Brothers, Fernando and Humberto, reuse and adapt the stuff of everyday into furniture formations that blur the border between conceptual art and design with humor and irony. The ostensibly silly transforms into an object of fine craftsmanship and haute status. Collected plush stuffed animals present an ideal medium to reinterpret the idea of seating. 

Fernando and Humberto Campana, Cake Stool, 2008, stuffed animals hand sewn on canvas cover over brushed stainless steel structure, 21.65 x 47.25 x 47.25 inches (55 x 120 x 120 cm), Edition of 150

Courtesy of Friedman Benda and the Estudio Campana

Fernando and Humberto Campana, Dolphins & Sharks Banquette Chair, 2002, stuffed animals hand sewn on canvas cover over brushed stainless steel structure, 33.46 x 39.37 x 55.12 inches (85 x 100 x 140 cm), Edition of 35

Courtesy of Friedman Benda and the Estudio Campana

Roman-based designer Maria Cristina Bellucci recently became enamored with colored pencils as a means for personal adornment departing from her metalworking methods. Her objective is to give new meaning to the things that surround her in daily life. The colored pencils are formed with slight irregularity and glued for a vibrant modern and fashionable accessory. Colored pencils whose purpose is to create art, are reinterpreted for an alternate ideal of the objet d'art. 

Necklace, colored pencils and silver, length 23.5 inches (60 cm)

Courtesy of Maria Cristina Bellucci

Maria Cristina Bellucci, bracelet, colored pencils, 4.3 x .6 inches (110 x 15 mm)

Courtesy of Maria Cristina Bellucci

Nikolay Sardamov cleverly recycles and adapts discarded rubber inner tubes from bicycles for dramatic and original jewelry pieces. Rubber is durable and malleable providing a myriad of design motifs. Dirty trash transformed into the artfully chic.

Courtesy of Nikolay Sardamov; photograph by Aleksandar Nishkov

Courtesy Nikolay Sardamov; photography by Aleksandar Nishkov